Our quality

While most of us love beer, only few of us know exactly how it’s made. It takes carefully selected ingredients and 10 steps to craft a Royal Dutch. Let’s start at the beginning…

Our quality

While most of us love beer, only few of us know exactly how it’s made. It takes carefully selected ingredients and 10 steps to craft a Royal Dutch. Let’s start at the beginning…

1. Malting

The first thing our brewers need to do is to make sure the grain is ready to go. They warm and moisten it, which makes it sprout. This creates enzymes that are needed for brewing. Finally, grain is dried and/or roasted. Depending how long it is roasted, the end result is a more light or dark malt, influencing the taste and colour of your beer.

2. Milling

The malted barley is stored in large silos at our brewery. When selected for production, it is send through a grist mill, cracking it open. The challenge is not to crush it too fine (making the brew gummy and unusable) or crush it too course (not exposing all enzymes). Now the malt is ready for the next step.

3. Mashing

Our brewers transfer the milled malted grains to a large mash tun containing purified hot water and heat it to different temperatures. Typical mashes have a texture of 3 parts water and 1 part grains. Once mixed, the mash is left to stand at 65C for about an hour. This activates the enzymes to break down the grain and release its sugars.

4. Lautering

Next, our brewers transfer the liquid to a vessel with a false-bottom called a lauter tun. This separates the solid components from a clear, sticky and sweet liquid. This extract, a sugar solution, is called wort and is not yet beer.

5. Boiling

The wort is boiled for about 60 minutes in the wort copper to sterilize the beer. At the same time, our brewers add hops, a small green flower that provides bitterness to balance out all the sugar in the wort and to add taste. Hop also act as a natural preservative, which is what they were in first instance used for.

6. Whirlpooling

Once the boil is completed, our brewers pump it from the kettle into a whirlpool and set it into rotation. This causes the wort to spin and clear it from hop remainders and proteins that were released during brewing.

7. Cooling

Now the clear wort has to be cooled quickly, before it begins to oxidize and produce off flavours. Using a wort cooler, our brewers bring the temperature down in a few seconds to a constant 8 degrees Celsius. When cooled, the wort is moved to a large fermentation tank. 

8. Fermenting

Now is where all the magic happens. Our brewers add pure yeast to the tank, a single-cell organism that breaks down the sugar in the wort and turn it into carbon dioxide and alcohol. It’s also during the fermentation process, which lasts about 7 to 10 days, that a lot of aromas and flavours find their origin.

9. Storing

At last, we have beer! Now our brewers store it cold for one to three weeks at 0°C. During this phase, the secondary fermentation and maturation of the beer takes place. This is called ‘conditioning’.

10. Filtration

Once the conditioning is over, our brewers remove the yeast, leaving a bright, clear beer. Now it’s time to organize the packaging, into bottles, cans and/or kegs. This is also the moment that we do quality controls to check if your Royal Dutch can live up to its high standards. Soon it will be shipped to a store or bar near you…

1. MALTING

The first thing our brewers need to do is to make sure the grain is ready to go. They warm and moisten it, which makes it sprout. This creates enzymes that are needed for brewing. Finally, grain is dried and/or roasted. Depending how long it is roasted, the end result is a more light or dark malt, influencing the taste and colour of your beer.

2. Milling

The malted barley is stored in large silos at our brewery. When selected for production, it is send through a grist mill, cracking it open. The challenge is not to crush it too fine (making the brew gummy and unusable) or crush it too course (not exposing all enzymes). Now the malt is ready for the next step.

3. Mashing

Our brewers transfer the milled malted grains to a large mash tun containing purified hot water and heat it to different temperatures. Typical mashes have a texture of 3 parts water and 1 part grains. Once mixed, the mash is left to stand at 65C for about an hour. This activates the enzymes to break down the grain and release its sugars.

4. Lautering

Next, our brewers transfer the liquid to a vessel with a false-bottom called a lauter tun. This separates the solid components from a clear, sticky and sweet liquid. This extract, a sugar solution, is called wort and is not yet beer.

5. Boiling

The wort is boiled for about 60 minutes in the wort copper to sterilize the beer. At the same time, our brewers add hops, a small green flower that provides bitterness to balance out all the sugar in the wort and to add taste. Hop also act as a natural preservative, which is what they were in first instance used for.

6. Whirlpooling

Once the boil is completed, our brewers pump it from the kettle into a whirlpool and set it into rotation. This causes the wort to spin and clear it from hop remainders and proteins that were released during brewing.

7. Cooling

Now the clear wort has to be cooled quickly, before it begins to oxidize and produce off flavours. Using a wort cooler, our brewers bring the temperature down in a few seconds to a constant 8 degrees Celsius. When cooled, the wort is moved to a large fermentation tank. 

8. Fermenting

Now is where all the magic happens. Our brewers add pure yeast to the tank, a single-cell organism that breaks down the sugar in the wort and turn it into carbon dioxide and alcohol. It’s also during the fermentation process, which lasts about 7 to 10 days, that a lot of aromas and flavours find their origin.

9. Storing

At last, we have beer! Now our brewers store it cold for one to three weeks at 0°C. During this phase, the secondary fermentation and maturation of the beer takes place. This is called ‘conditioning’.

10. Filtration

Once the conditioning is over, our brewers remove the yeast, leaving a bright, clear beer. Now it’s time to organize the packaging, into bottles, cans and/or kegs. This is also the moment that we do quality controls to check if your Royal Dutch can live up to its high standards. Soon it will be shipped to a store or bar near you…

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